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Early publications (1866-1875)


North Staffordshire Naturalists' Field Club publication, 1866.

1. "Report, read at the First Annual Meeting, held March 23rd, 1866."

North Staffordshire Naturalists' Field Club was established in early April 1865. The numerous field trips in the summer and autumn of that year are noted and described, some quite briefly. Notably, five paragraphs describe the botany and geology of the Trentham Estate in 1866. There is also a short summary of the archeological items then found known to have been found in Thor's Cave.

2. A short account of the First Annual Meeting, 23rd March 1866 in Stoke.

Membership is 117, including 27 ladies. A Library is planned, but for the moment the members have access to: Quarterly Journal of Science ; Geological Magazine; Quarterly Journal of Microscopical Science; Science Gossip; Popular Science Review; and the Entomologists' Annual.

3. Club Accounts.

4. List of members, with their geographical location noted.


North Staffordshire Naturalists' Field Club Annual Report, 1868.

1. "Report, read at the Third Annual Meeting, held April 16th, 1868."

Attendance at group excusions is very low. Difficulties in getting the club underway in 1867, and the need for members to be doing active work in their field. Brief notes on excusions and papers read.

2. Short report on the Third Annual Meeting. Proposal to explicitly include archaeological work in their remit was voted down.

3. Accounts.

4. List of members, with their geographical location noted.

5. Rules.

6. List of Proposed Excusions for 1868.


North Staffordshire Naturalists' Field Club Annual Report, 1869.

1. "Report, read at the Fourth Annual Meeting, held April 8th, 1869."

The Club and its excusions are now thriving, aided by the wonderful summer weather of 1868. Membership is 124, including 24 ladies. One notable section gives a complete list of the mosses to be found at Oakamoor.

2. Short report on the Fourth Annual Meeting. It was noted that the group's interest in "Natural History" was very broadly interpreted, including fossils, geology and landscapes. (In the first decade of the Club archaeological sites come to provide useful early spring excursions, before botany etc can begin).

3. List of members, with their geographical location noted.

4. Rules.

6. List of Proposed Excusions for 1869.

7. T. Wardle, "Geology of The Roaches".

A very detailed account of the underlying geology. The area's supply of clean water to the Potteries. The underlying geology between Leek and the Roaches. Measures viewable on The Roaches. Fossils at Goldsitch. Exact sequence of coal measures at Goldsitch. The area's watercourses. Sandstones and Millstone Grits. Wider historical context.


North Staffordshire Naturalists' Field Club Annual Report, 1870.

1. "Report, read at the Fifth Annual Meeting, held March 31st, 1870."

The club is reported to be thriving. There are now 220 members. Mention of a "large fossil tree" discovered in the Marl Pit at Joiner's Square, Hanley. Accounts of the summer excursions, and winter meetings including the first in Leek. 1868 was a very poor year for insects, 1868/9 winter was incredibly warm and mild in central England.

2. A very short report on the Fifth Annual Meeting.

3. Accounts.

4. List of Journals now available to members.

5. List of Proposed Excusions for 1870.

6. List of members, with their geographical location noted.

7. Rules.

8. R. Garner, "Address by R. Garner, F.L.S. (Chairman), Annual Meeting, March 31st, 1870".

Broad meditation around the idea "Ours is an age when old established opinions receive rude shocks" [from the new sciences]. Notes that their geological work has not seen any interference from the local clergy. Evolution and the Bible.

9. J.E. Davies, "On a Fossil Tree in Marl Works near Joiner's Square, Hanley".

Meandering five page abstract from a longer paper. Tree was found in upright growing position, but leaning, suggesting a slight tipping of the coal measure. A younger companion tree was found in the same position three weeks later.

10. John Ward, "Notes on the Fossil Trees in Messrs. Hampton's Marl Pit, at Joiner's Square."

The marls being dug at the pit "appear to lie between the Gutter, or 'Fenton Low Coal,' and the Bassey Mine Ironstone." Main tree found summer 1867, 18ft high, 9ft around, with no roots remaining. "Considerable quantity" of fossil plants around the two trees. Identification is Sigillaria.

11. John Sleigh, "Meeting at Leek, February 24th, 1870".

Short article with some new facts from the locality, gathered since his publication of The History of Leek.


North Staffordshire Naturalists' Field Club Annual Report, 1871.

1. "Report, read at the Sixth Annual Meeting, held March 31st, 1871."

The Club continues to thrive. Short general accounts of the summer and winter meetings. A hybrid between the Bilberry and the Cowberry had been found growing on the Maer Hills.

2. A short report on the Sixth Annual Meeting.

3. Accounts; Journals available to members; List of Future Excusions and Evening Meetings.

4. List of members, with their geographical location noted. (260)

5. Rules.

6. Address by the President, Dr. Arlidge. Outgoing President, Annual Meeting, March 31st 1871.

Is the Club doing all it can? Its past and future. Need for "work parties" on the excursions. Discovery of the importance of minute organisms, role in disease and decay. Their role in forming strata.


North Staffordshire Naturalists' Field Club Annual Report, 1872.

1. "Report, read at the Seventh Annual Meeting, held March 21st, 1872."

Short general accounts of the summer and winter meetings. The second winter meeting is held at the Wedgwood Institute in Burslem. Recent local insect discoveries. The Club, having established itself, it now starting to be held in higher esteem.

2. A very short report on the Seventh Annual Meeting.

3. Accounts; Journals available to members; List of Future Excusions and Evening Meetings.

4. List of members, with their geographical location noted. (278)

5. Rules.

6. "Address by the President, Rev. S. J. Broad, M.A. Outgoing President, Annual Meeting, March 21st 1872.

Intimations of a split between "the really scientific members" and others in the Club. The need to cultivate the habit of interested observation, in terms of finding interest in an excursion site that may at first seem to lack interest. Observing the habits and songs of birds.

7. Rev. Thos. W. Daltry, "On the Lepidoptera of North Staffordshire".

North Staffordshire especially rich in moth life, about average for butterflies. An overview of the varieties of butterflies. Rarities. An extensive section on moths. Ability to do field work is greatly enhanced by the railway network.


North Staffordshire Naturalists' Field Club Annual Report, 1873.

1. "Report, read at the Eighth Annual Meeting, held March 27th, 1873."

Growing numbers, but the Club's growth is levelling off. Short general accounts of the summer and winter meetings. Extended list of the plant species found on the Little Orme, Llandudno. At Stoke the "Athenaeum Committee kindly threw open their interesting Museum, the only classified Museum in North Staffordshire". The Wedgwood Institute at Burslem is again a venue, where the technology of lantern slides makes its appearance in one talk. The Club now has 278 members, 75 of whom are ladies. The address ends with a strong appeal for members to support the society by scientific work: "that it is a scientific Society, has hitherto depended upon the exertions of comparatively few of the Members".

2. A short report on the Eighth Annual Meeting. The Club's finances are excellent, with a balance of £21 9s. "Dr. Davis lent a very beautiful British Torque of fine gold, nearly 6 oz. in weight. It was found at Stanton, in the Moorlands in 1853."

3. Accounts; Journals available to members; List of Future Excusions and Evening Meetings.

4. List of members, with their geographical location noted. (280)

5. Rules.

6. T. Wardle, "Address by the President, T. Wardle Esq., F.G.S. On Limestone: its occurrence, nature and origin."

Local examples given where possible.


North Staffordshire Naturalists' Field Club Annual Report, 1874.

1. "Report, read at the Ninth Annual Meeting, held at Stoke-on-Trent, March 19th, 1874."

New links formed with similar Manchester groups. Continuing long-established links with Dudley and Midland Geological and Scientific Society. List of plants found at Wallasey Sandhills. Substantive accounts of the summer and winter meetings. The Club is now able to attract notable speakers from outside its ranks.

2. A short report on the Ninth Annual Meeting.

3. Accounts; Journals available to members; List of Future Excusions and Evening Meetings.

4. List of members, with their geographical location noted. (280)

5. Rules.

6. James Yates, "Address by the President. A Month's Tour Through France & Italy."

Followed by short accounts of recent discoveries. Continued debate about Darwin and evolution. The influence on the Club's leaders of John Aiken and Mrs Barbauld's story "Eyes and No Eyes" is again attested to. "it is intended to publish a work 'On the Natural History and Archaeology of Staffordshire' collected from papers and observations of Members of our Club".

7. C. Lynham Esq., V.P. "Croxden Abbey".

Ground plan of the Abbey. Historical overview and account of the remains.

8. W. S. Brough, V.P., "The Literature of Botany".

Historical survey.

9. Rev. Thos. W. Daltry, "On Some Lepidoptera New to the District: taken in 1873".

New butterflies and moths.


North Staffordshire Naturalists' Field Club Annual Report, 1875.

1. "Report, read at the Tenth Annual Meeting, held at Stoke-on-Trent, March 18th, 1875."

Summer excusions now have nominated leaders. Accounts of the summer and winter meetings. First mention of a winter meeting at Newcastle-under-Lyme. 330 members, of whom 82 are ladies, and "in point of numbers it is [now] one of the largest Societies of the kind in the country".

2. A short report on the Tenth Annual Meeting. The Club makes a £55 profit per year.

3. Accounts; Journals available to members; List of Future Excusions and Evening Meetings.

4. List of members, with their geographical location noted. (325)

5. Rules.

6. C. Lynham, "Address of the President, C. Lynham Esq., Annual Meeting, March 18th, 1875: On The Sepulchral Monuments of Staffordshire".

Short general overview.

7. W. Molyneux Esq. F.G.S., "The Geology of Needwood Forest".

Detailed account, followed by a debunking of claims that there may be coal under the forest.

8. Rev. J. S. Broad, M.A., "Uriconium".

Roman era city at Wroxeter, a short account of the site in the 1870s.

9. C. Lynham Esq. V.P., "Ancient Church Bells in Staffordshire".

Short but detailed survey. List of rarer inscriptions and their locations. Some notes on local bell makers.

10. J. T. Arlidge, "Structural Features of Plants: in relation to their uses in the Arts and in Medicine".

General survey of the world's useful plants.


North Staffordshire Naturalists' Field Club Addresses, Papers. Etc (1875).

Preface.

Introduction. By THOMAS W, DALTRY, M.A., F.L.S. [Complete list of papers read before the Club]

Annual Addresses:

Annual Address, 1870. By ROBERT GARNER, F.L.S.

Annual Address, 1871. By J. T. ARLIDGE, M.D.

Annual Address, 1873. On Limestone : its Occurrence, Nature, and Origin. By THOMAS WARDLE, F.G.S.

On the Interments of Primitive Man. By J. BARNARD DAVIS, M.D., F.R.S., F.A.S. Illustrated. [Overview inspired by the opening of a Bronze Age round barrow at Caldon Low]

Rambling Thoughts in a Hanley Marl Pit. By J. E. DAVIS.

Notes on the Fossil Trees in a Marl Pit at Hanley. By JOHN WARD, F.G.S [Illustrated with plate for "Organic Remains of the Coal Measures"]

Lines on a Fossil Tree. By ROBERT GARNER, F.L.S. [Poem]

A Sketch of Old Newcastle. By J. S. BROAD, M.A. [Short general history of the town]

The Trentham Gravel Beds. By WILLIAM MOLYNEUX, F.G.S.

Croxden Abbey : its History and Architectural Features. By CHARLES LYNAM. Illustrated.

The Literature of Botany. By W. S. BROUGH.

The Geology of Mow Cop, Congleton Edge, and the surrounding District. By J. D. SAINTER, F.G.S. [Also some notes on the fossils around Macclesfield]

On the Absence of Waterfalls in the Scenery of North Staffordshire. By J. E. DAVIS.

The Mistletoe. By THOMAS W. DALTRY, M.A., F.L.S.

An Outline of the History of English Mediaeval Architecture, illustrated by Staffordshire Examples. By CHARLES LYNAM.

On the Organic Remains of the Coal Measures of North Staffordshire. By JOHN WARD, F.G.S. Illustrated. [Extensive catalogue of fossil fauna found in the coal measures]

Macro-Lepidoptera taken and observed in North Staffordshire by Members of the Club. By THOMAS W. DALTRY, M.A., F.L.S. [List]